Today’s Trend, Tomorrow’s Policy


In addition to my last post, I also wanted to claim that the demographics of the US are shifting in favor of more dense living patterns. Whether that is due to migration or sub-replacement fertility, I have no idea.

Here are two charts, the first shows the trend population growth in Colorado among the top 10 counties (by population) in 1920. The only county not growing is Denver county, which is the “heart” of downtown. I speculate that the reason for this is the push toward single-family dwellings in the latter half of the 20th century. Jefferson, Arapahoe, Adams, Boulder, and Weld all contain suburbs and exurbs in the Denver metropolitan area. El Paso contains Colorado Springs.

This second chart shows the trend population growth rate among the bottom 10 counties (by population) in 1920. I’m not sure what tiny towns these counties contain…but their population level is essentially flat, or falling.

Trend rate of the average of largest 10 and smallest 10:

If I had it my way, the charts would show much sharper trends :P.


A map of Colorado’s counties, for reference:

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2 thoughts on “Today’s Trend, Tomorrow’s Policy

  1. I can only hope the trend grows sharply in the future. Maybe, as some people fear, Obama will get his Marxist wish and tax gas to $7 and make rural living unreasonable. 🙂

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